DIY Reusable Snack Bags, super quick make

Making reusable snack bags with waxed fabric is super easy, and such a practical way to carry snacks in your bag for toddlers, or yourself.

 DIY reusable snack bags are perfect for packing snacks for lunch or work. A great and super easy eco swap to reduce plastic use.

These rather cute little snack bags with a waxed fabric waterproof lining are perfect for a lunch bag, handbag or pocket on the school run! Personally I find them useful for carrying decaf tea bags with me.

Homemade snack bags reduce our waste, they are super easy to make and are easily wiped clean once used. Check out my accompanying reusable sandwich wrap tutorial and reusable lunch bag tutorial.

If you are looking for more eco sewing projects check my round up of great sewing projects, reusable items for everyday living.

How to make a reusable snack bag

You will need two pieces of fabric measuring 5 by 14” each, one of which is waxed, plus a piece of velcro approx 3”.

Place a piece of velcro 1″ down centrally on the bottom edge of your external fabric. If your fabric has a directional print place it at the top of the print.

Stitch in place.

Place your opposite piece of velcro 1″ down centrally on your waxed lining fabric, stitch in place.

Put your two pieces of fabric right sides together, with the velcro pieces at opposite ends. Stitch from the top right edge of the lining (with velcro at top) down and round back up to the top left.

Turn right side out. Turn in the opening.

Topstitch in place.

Create the pocket by folding up the bottom edge so the linings face each other, creating a pocket 5″ along the edges.

Topstitch in place to secure. Your top will then fold down and your velcro secure shut your reusable snack bag.

 DIY reusable snack bags are perfect for packing snacks for lunch or work. A great and super easy eco swap to reduce plastic use.

Would you love to sew bags but feel intimidated? Check out my Bag Making for Beginners Ebook

2 thoughts on “DIY Reusable Snack Bags, super quick make”

  1. Thank you for not making these from “oilcloth” which is actually vinyl fused to cotton fabric. Most vinyl fabrics have lead in them making them unsuitable for contact with food and food storage. Washington state banned children’s vinyl lunchboxes when they discovered significant amounts of lead in foods taken for lunches, even though those foods never touched the actual vinyl and were in sandwich bags or containers of their own.

    Reply

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