Sewing for a tween – Growing Up Handmade Blog Tour

Sewing for a tween – Growing Up Handmade Blog Tour
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I don’t know about you but finding appropriate clothes for a tween can be slightly tricky. My daughter is developing her sense of style, but is at that awkward stage of outgrowing the clothes ranges we usually shop at (she in age 12 clothes). As a mere 10 year old teenager ranges are not suitable for her in style. I find clothes buying and making rather stressful.

So the opportunity to take part in this Growing Up Handmade tour seemed a great idea, focussing me to sew for a tween. The challenge for her and I to find patterns and fabric she likes the look of. Children come in all shapes and sizes, sewing for her means I can adjust patterns to fit her shape – she often finds sleeves a little tight on the arms.

We both fell in love with the pattern by Love Notions called Li’l LDT. The options seem endless, a shirt, tunic and dress with five different sleeves and four different necklines. The size range is impressive too, ranging from age 2 to 16, great value for money. I bought mine from Etsy here.

I have made her two items. We started with knit fabric I had in my stash to create a dress with a fabulous hem line and cowl neck. My daughter LOVES this dress, she has worn all weekend every weekend!!!

sewing for a tween

May be because she lives in black leggings and this black jacket?! They pair so well together.

Secondly she loved the idea of a hoody (personally ??? what? where did that come from??!), I ordered this navy jersey from Minerva Crafts. It has a slight texture to it, adding a touch of detail.

I adjusted the pattern a little, sewing a 12 I shortened the sleeves and made the hood slightly smaller. With the remainder of the fabric I  managed to squeeze an age 3 dress out for my niece.

sewing for a tween

I have loved sewing for a tween – the team effort of fabric choice and pattern resulted in two items she practically lives in. Such a win win – plus of course it’s such a versatile pattern from which I can sew many more items for her. I hope this blog tour will inspire you to sew for a tween.
There is a fabulous giveaway running alongside this blog tour, with some great prizes from various sponsors:
a Rafflecopter giveaway

 Please do visit the other bloggers taking part to find lots of great inspiration.

Monday – April 17th
Handmade Boy | Paisley Roots | Cucicucicoo: Eco Sewing & Crafting

Tuesday – April 18th
Beri Bee Designs | Phat Quarters | Sewing By Ti | Sew and Tell Project

Wednesday – April 19th
The Wholesome Mama | Rebel & Malice | Vicky Myers Creations

Thursday – April 20th
Pattern Revolution | Skirt Fixation | SewSophieLynn | EYMM

Friday – April 21st
Round Up and Giveway Winners

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Rust fabric – Create beautiful patterns on fabric with rust

Rust fabric – Create beautiful patterns on fabric with rust
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Love collecting pieces of rusty metal off the beach? Wonder what to do with them once home?! My eye has been drawn to fabric dyed with rust – somehow I started yet another Pinterest board! The patterns on rust fabric are beautiful.

I love the random nature of rust dyed fabric. It is hard to control the results but that is part of the fun. Different fabrics will react slightly differently, some may dye quicker than others.

These are my experiments (to date!)

How to dye fabric with rust

Collect a variety of objects with rust – your fabric will need to be touching rust for the colour to develop.

Collection of rust objects, create rust fabric

Soak your fabric in a ration of 50:50 vinegar and water.

rusty nails - create rust fabric

Place rust fabric on top of fabric, alternatively wrap the objects in fabric.

The rust dye will take anywhere between a day and five days to develop.

Rust dying fabric

Bright sunshine helps the rust develop.

Once dyed wash the fabric.

Rust fabric drying on washing line

 Rust fabric, creating patterns

Having experimented dying fabric with found rust objects I moved on to experiment with non rusty items. My thoughts were could I have more control over the results, create patterns?? I experimented with pins, staples and metal washers. Non of these objects had rust to start with. I pleated the fabric, adding the metal items to see if I could create specific patterns.

Initially the results looked unpromising but after two to three days I am delighted with the results.

  • Dying with pins

  • Dying with metal washers

  • Dying with staples

These results were not as controlled as I anticipated but I still love them.

Naturally the next question is what to make with rust dyed fabric? I am thinking slow stitch could be beautiful – a piece of wall art? a rust fabric lampshade?

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How to make a recycled tyre bug hotel (post sponsored by Volkswagen)

How to make a recycled tyre bug hotel (post sponsored by Volkswagen)
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Bug hotels are all the rage, its not hard to see why. Building a bug hotel is a great activity to involve children in. It sparks an interest in insects, wildlife and the outdoors.

Your tyre bug hotel can shelter bumblebees, ladybirds , woodlice and so much more. The autumn is great time of year to build one as you are likely to have a variety of natural materials available. You can use straw, dry grass and hollow plant stems.

use-a-former-tyre-to-create-a-fun-diy-bug-hotel-hoe-to-make-your-own-but-hotel-on-the-blog

To make your own recycled tyre bug hotel balance your tyre on a piece of brick either side. I found this tyre dumped by the side of the road, but I am sure you can ask your local garage for an old tyre.

Place something like sticks or straw across the base of the tyre. It needs to be a material which crosses the gap within the tyre. We have used sticks.

recycled-tyre-bug-hotel-diy-tutorial

Cut a piece of wood to lay on top, it needs to be the width of the tyre tube.

cut-wood-to-size

Place your next layer. We have used pieces of a old hose pipe, followed by the stems from our corn crop. In the middle we have placed a former brick drain pipe, with a vw logo made out of foam board.

kids-love-building-diy-bug-htels

Place a layer of wood across. Fill your next layer, we have used the pine cones followed by sticks.

pine-cone-layer-of-recycled-tyre-bug-hotel

It’s dead easy to make and makes a fun alternative to have a round DIY bug hotel.

This post is sponsored by Volkswagen – check out other recycled and/or car related tutorials by fellow bloggers on the Volkswagen collaborative pinterest board “DIY Bloggers for Volkswagen“.

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vickymyerscreations

vickymyerscreations

I am inspired by our wonderful world, creation is constant and yet changing. I feel it is important to respect the environment and where possible to upcycle/recycle. Blessed with creativity I try to appreciate it and develop it:) Thanks for taking the time to read my blog, please do sign up to follow my journey:)

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