Upcycled tablet case – Creative fun with a former jacket

Upcycled tablet case – Creative fun with a former jacket

For some time I have had a former suit jacket in my stash waiting for inspiration to strike. When I saw a great clutch bag on instructables from a former jacket (see here) I knew I had to dig it out and have a play:)

Inspired I decided to play with the idea of an upcycled tablet case using the collar of the jacket as a closing flap. My work are currently issuing some staff with tablets, perhaps an opportunity to make a few sales?

Jacket Upcycled tablet case

Firstly I worked out the dimensions for the finished case and cut out fusible fleece this size. This then worked as a pattern piece when laying out the sleeve of the jacket and the collar.

Fabric placement, design ideas for tablet case cover

I folded the side edges of the collar, pinning then hand stitching closed. I added a button hole for button closure of the upcycled tablet case.

Turn collar edges in

I utilized the fold of the collar as the fold over closure, tacking this in place before sewing up in usual tablet case fashion! Naturally I used a shirt for the lining:)

Frustratingly the collar curled up at the edges.

UPcycled Tablet case in progress

I spray starched the collar to assist with laying flat. Then added velcro under the corner edges.

Upcycled Tablet Case, closure using button and velcro

This has made a significant difference, but I wish I knew why it curled at the edges in the first place! As you can see adding some top stitching at the last minute has brought out details, complimenting the original features from the jacket.

Hand sticthing empahsized jacket details

If you would like a tutorial for a tablet case I have one here.  Any suggestions as to why the collar curled or how to prevent it in future gratefully received:)

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Top tips for converting jeans into a skirt

Top tips for converting jeans into a skirt

For a ridiculously long time I have been meaning to try my hand at converting jeans into a skirt. You may wonder how this fits with one of my New Years goals to slim my wardrobe down. One of my christmas gifts was the book “The life changing magic of tidying” by Marie Kondo.

So far I have parted with two bin bags of clothes – rather a shocking quantity. My wardrobe really does feel liberated. When I open the door I am no longer overwhelmed with uninspiring clothes, instead I am greeted with a few clothes I enjoy wearing. I feel as though I have gained a whole new wardrobe!! As part of this process I have identified a few key wardrobe staples I am short of – one being a denim skirt.

I did struggle to part with some clothes which are a little small.  Then their were clothes that I have been meaning to repair.  One pair of jeans had stitching gone in the crutch area – this was just too tricky to try and restitch.

worn stitching in old jeans

 

Time to convert the jeans into a skirt. I started with reading a few tutorials on line – find some here on my recycled denim pinterest board.

Transform your jeans into a skirt - quick and easy to do

These are my top tips for converting jeans into a skirt:

  • Change the needle on your sewing machine to denim
  • Lengthen the stitch length
  • Fit the walking foot (if you have one). These three tips encourage your sewing machine to cope with the thickness of denim fabric.
  • Use an existing skirt for width and length guides
  • Slim the hem by turning up once and securing with sewing tape or bias binding

Its really simple to do, so much so I can’t quite believe I hadn’t made one years ago! Start with unpicking the inside leg seams. Use an existing skirt to work out the suitable length – don’t forget to allow seam allowance for turning up.

unpick seams in former trousers

Piece in some of the discarded leg to create a great A line shape.

piece in using spare fabric from trouser leg

Lastly hem – I used bias binding as my machine would have thrown a hissing fit at being asked to sew through three layers of denim, particularly the french seams!

Bias binding to hem denim skirt

It really took hardly any time at all:)

Transform jeans into a skirt

Do you have a favorite denim recreation?

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Sewing with and for children

Teaching your child to sew

Its been a delight to have a little time to sew for and with my daughter in the post Christmas breath and relax time. For far longer than I care to admit A has been asking me to make her some nappies for her dolls which wee. Disposable dolls nappies are shocking in price and yet it is so easy to make your own.

Create dolls nappies from fabric scraps and an old towel

I used the disposable dolls nappy as a template, an old towel and a variety of fabric to whip up a few. The overlocker objected to the towel but I coaxed it along!

  • Spark your child’s interest

Creating a practical item sparked her interest in sewing (I guess making her clothes seems too far removed from her skill level to relate to).  She decided she would like to make duvets for her dolls bunk beds.

Dolls duvet covers from pillowcases, teach your child to sew with projects they love

  • Focus on basic sewing skills

This was a great quick project, she practised using pins and sewing a straight line. This is a fun and quick project, great for learning basic sewing skills. You can imagine her delight when I explained that by using pillowcases they had three seams sewn for her:)!

Inspirational books for teaching your child to sew

  • Start with a project which inspires the child
Last year our neighbour kindly gave her a book all about learning to sew. I think its a great read but at the time it did not strike a chord for her. This year I bought her Martha Stewarts book Crafts for Kids, she is bookmarking projects she likes the look of. It has motivated her to design and hand sew up soft toys for her and her brother.

This has brought her great delight, she took one into school and has taken requests for making more:) She is using upcycled sweaters for her soft toys.

Upcycled cuddly toys, use former sweaters to inspire your child to sew

  • Create time

There is no rush, sewing can be a lifelong pleasure. Taking  a step from sewing for the Etsy shop (which is rather empty!) and blogging created time for us to enjoy sewing together and alongside one another.

Do you have any top tips for teaching children to sew? We are sticking to projects she wants to make, that are quick and simple.

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vickymyerscreations

vickymyerscreations

I am inspired by our wonderful world, creation is constant and yet changing. I feel it is important to respect the environment and where possible to upcycle/recycle. Blessed with creativity I try to appreciate it and develop it:) Thanks for taking the time to read my blog, please do sign up to follow my journey:)

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