Upcycling Archives - Page 2 of 26 - vicky myers creations

DIY Mans Messenger Bag (post sponsored by Volkswagen)

DIY Mans Messenger Bag (post sponsored by Volkswagen)
Facebooktwittergoogle_plus

Fancy creating an alternative mans messenger bag utilising a car seat belt?? Regular readers will be familiar with my passion for bag making and recycling – this bag combines both.

detailed-view-of-mans-messenger-bag

Personally I think this bag is a great gift for a dad with a toddler, beyond the nappy bag stage but still needing to carry endless “stuff” around!

 

To make you will need:

Main bag fabric
12 1/2″ by 11″ three times
12 1/2″ by 3 1/2″ twice
3 1/2″ by 11″ once

Lining fabric
12 1/2″ by 11″ three times
12 1/2″ by 3 1/2″ twice
3 1/2″ by 11″ once

7 by 61/2″ pocket piece

Fusible fleece:
11 1/2″ by 10″ twice
11 1/2″ by 2 1/2″ twice
2 1/2″ by 10″ once

Iron on interfacing:
11 1/2″ by 10″ three times
11 1/2″ by 2 1/2″ twice
2 1/2″ by 10″ once

Car seat belt 2 metres

Bias binding 1 metre

Fabric glue

Fabric paint

Paint brush

Strap
Strap fixtures

To make:-

Paint the car design onto the lining fabric. You could create a print with lino. Or use a cookie cutter to print a line image of the car. Paint the edge of the cookie cutter and simply print onto the fabric. Use the cookie cutter to cut out a car design on a potato then potato print a solid car design on the pocket.

Iron fusible fleece to the back of the main fabric, leaving one piece of the main fabric with no fusible fleece on it (this is the flap of the bag).

Iron the interfacing to the back of the lining fabric.

Body of the bag

Pin the side panels to the front of the bag, right sides together. Stitch from the top of the bag down to the bottom of the fusible fleece. Stopping the seam here helps form the base of the bag easily.

pin-sides-of-bag

Place the base of the bag along the bottom of the front panel and stitch along the edge of the fusible fleece. Stitch the base of the bag and side panels together along the fusible fleece line.

pin-base-of-bag

Pin and stitch the back of the bag panel to the sides and bag base.

Lining

Create the slip pocket. Fold over twice the top of the pocket and stitch. Press the sides and base of the pocket in half an inch. Pin centrally on one of the front/back panels of lining.

 

Double stitch round the sides and bottom of the pocket.

 

Flap of the bag

Cut seat belt fabric into five strips 12″ long. Using fabric adhesive carefully place down the flap panel, making sure they butt up as closely as possible.

g-3

Weight down with a heavy book until the glue is dry.

g-4

Once the glue is dry top stitch down the edge of each strap to ensure they are fully secured.

stitch-seat-belt-fabric

Place the lining of the flap right sides down, place the front of the flap on top right side facing you.

Curve the corners if you wish. Mark with tailors chalk a curve (I used a cup as a template) and trim the layers.

flap

Pin your bias binding round the sides and bottom of the flap. Stitch in place.

bias

Fold the bias binding over to the back, pin from the front ensuring you capture the back neatly, then top stitch in place.

bias-binding

Bag assembly

Strap handles – cut two pieces of strap 71/2″ long. Thread on metal loop. Place the strap in a loop on the side panel. Stitch in place securely, ensuring the join of the loop is beneath the stitches.

loop

Place the flap onto the back of the bag. Work out the central point just in from the bottom of the flap and insert magnetic snap  into the lining. Work out corresponding point on the front of the bag and insert the other half of the magnetic snap.

Pin then baste the flap along the back edge of the bag (right sides together).

Place the main bag inside the lining so the right sides are together. Pin in place.

g-1

Stitch around leaving a turning gap along the front of the bag.

Turn right side out. Turn in the raw edges along the turning gap and pin in place. Top stitch right round this seam (this secures the turning gap and provides a little extra strength to the bag)

 

Lastly add strap 60″ long using a slider for adjustable cross body strap.


I’m loving this fun car themed bag.

 This post is sponsored by Volkswagen – check out other recycled and or car related tutorials by fellow bloggers on the Volkswagen collaborative Pinterest board “DIY Bloggers for Volkswagen“.

signature

 

 

 

Related posts:

Facebooktwittergoogle_plus

Creative Upcycling Competition

Facebooktwittergoogle_plus

Have I ever told you I’m a last minute person? Today is the closing date for an upcycling competition being held by Korbond, with a prize of a sewing machine its got to be worth an entry!

This week I read a great article “It can take an incredible 2700 liters of water to produce the cotton for just one single t-shirt. With only one percent of the world’s water supplies being clean and accessible, this is highly significant. Cotton farming also takes up agricultural land that could be used to produce food for local communities and it uses an extremely high number of chemicals during production.” (1millionwomen) Any competition which encourages extending the life of clothes needs to be supported.

The competition is to upcycle two garments into one. I new straight away that I wished to experiment with an old patchwork liberty waistcoat I made for a school project (25+ years ago) with sashiko inspired stitching.

A plan formed to create a skirt from a pair of cotton trousers, to be embellished with sashiko stitching and pieces of the liberty waistcoat.

Yesterday I finally spotted a pair of suitable trousers in a charity shop – today I spent stitching whilst listening to the radio, bliss.

Firstly I made the skirt (if you would like to know more about how to do that check out this tutorial).

Then the fun bit, I played with pieces of liberty fabric patchwork.

Lastly I hemmed the skirt – initially the plan was to turn under the hem ad hold with bondaweb. However this didn’t pan out so instead I used bias binding.

The project took the morning, what a lovely morning.

Plus I was treated to a great radio program “Tunes from the Trash” all about trash turned into musical instruments in Paraguayan. A program after my heart:)

Shortlisted garments will be shown at the Sewing for Pleasure event at NEC on the 19-21st March, with the winner chosen by the public. I expect there to be some high caliber entries, I look forward to seeing the upcycled garments.

signature

Related posts:

Facebooktwittergoogle_plus

DIY Valentines heart and key picture

DIY Valentines heart and key picture
Facebooktwittergoogle_plus

Remember the large box of keys my husband bought home for me to upcycle?? It prompted some thoughts about keys, the symbolism of our homes. If we are fortunate our home can mean so much; warmth, stability, security.

I thought it would be fun to create a picture of former childhood homes brought together to our married home (especially with Valentines coming up).

If you would like to make map heart picture for Valentines (engagement, wedding gift etc) you will need a printer, keys, and a box frame.

Start by searching for free maps on line (in the UK you can use Maps4free). Enter the location. Using the snipping tool highlight the area you wish and copy onto a word document, repeat for the second two locations. I copied snippets across which filled approximately half the word document per image. Print off the map for the three locations.

Cut out three hearts, the first two of the former homes being identical size the third a little larger. Mine measure approximately. You can download a template here.

Print two templates. Use one as a guide to cut out your hearts (I suggest cutting slightly larger), place on top of your outline shapes and adhere with a glue stick.

Using copydex place a key on each map (this covers the red your are here marker from Maps4free). Allow to fully dry, trim to size and frame in a box frame.

 

signature

Related posts:

Facebooktwittergoogle_plus
vickymyerscreations

vickymyerscreations

I am inspired by our wonderful world, creation is constant and yet changing. I feel it is important to respect the environment and where possible to upcycle/recycle. Blessed with creativity I try to appreciate it and develop it:) Thanks for taking the time to read my blog, please do sign up to follow my journey:)

View Full Profile →

Follow Us
Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestinstagram
Subscribe to Blog via Email

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 335 other subscribers

Newsletter

Craftsy
Totally tutorials tips tricks recipes how tos
Show Buttons
Hide Buttons