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DIY recycled planter – don’t throw rusty loaf tins away!

DIY recycled planter – don’t throw rusty loaf tins away!
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Wondering what to do with your rusty loaf tins? I hate throwing away old rusty baking tins when they reach the end of their baking life. But let’s face it no one wants rust on their cakes!!  This DIY recycled planter is inspired by the storage potential of the old rusty baking tins plus a love of reclaimed wood. It’s perfect for the kitchen making a great DIY herb planter:)

 

DIY Recycled Planter, DIY Herb planter

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DIY Recycled Planter

To make the DIY recycled planter you will need:-

Equipment needed:-

  • Sand paper
  • Drill
  • Ruler
  • Pencil
  • Chalk Paint Pen

Prepare your baking tins. If they have any flaky rust sand this off. Thoroughly wash to ensure they are completely grease free, I suggest using sugar soap.

Spray the chalk paint over the outside of the baking tins. It is best to spray a light layer, allow this to dry and then spray with a second coat. The beauty of using Novasol Spray is the paint dry’s in fifteen minutes.

Prepare your piece of wood. Saw it to size. Sand to reduce the chance of splinters.

Apply a stain or wax to your wood. This will protect the wood and provide a longer lifespan for the tin shelf unit. Allow to dry. I used Ronseal woodstain satin teak –  the darker stain adds contrast to the white tins. Resand for a rustic look.

Mark on the back of your tins a straight line to use as a guideline. Drill two drill holes in the back of the tins along your pencil line. Use a drill piece suitable for wood and metal.

Measure the plank of wood and your tins. Place your tins in position ensuring they are at right angles to your plank of wood. Using a pencil mark through your drill holes into the wood. Predrill a small hole in the wood at the marked places. Screw the tins into place.

Drill two holes an inch down from the top of your plank of wood. Mark on the wall. Using a masonry drill piece drill two holes for your screws. Add raw plugs into the predrilled holes. Screw the plank of wood to the wall.

Label the tins with chalk paint stickers. Mark the tins with the contents of your shelves with a chalk paint pen, finally fill your tins and admire your handy work!

You DIY recycled planter can store anything you, not just plants!! How about as laundry/cleaning materials or packing supplies such as parcel tapes, string, scissors. I have to admit my herbs were rather quickly replaced by cacti!

This project is linked upwith DIYideacenter a website I have just discovered – its full of great ideas for your home. Why not visit and be inspired?

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DIY Mans Messenger Bag (post sponsored by Volkswagen)

DIY Mans Messenger Bag (post sponsored by Volkswagen)
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Fancy creating an alternative mans messenger bag utilising a car seat belt?? Regular readers will be familiar with my passion for bag making and recycling – this bag combines both.

detailed-view-of-mans-messenger-bag

Personally I think this bag is a great gift for a dad with a toddler, beyond the nappy bag stage but still needing to carry endless “stuff” around!

 

To make you will need:

Main bag fabric
12 1/2″ by 11″ three times
12 1/2″ by 3 1/2″ twice
3 1/2″ by 11″ once

Lining fabric
12 1/2″ by 11″ three times
12 1/2″ by 3 1/2″ twice
3 1/2″ by 11″ once

7 by 61/2″ pocket piece

Fusible fleece:
11 1/2″ by 10″ twice
11 1/2″ by 2 1/2″ twice
2 1/2″ by 10″ once

Iron on interfacing:
11 1/2″ by 10″ three times
11 1/2″ by 2 1/2″ twice
2 1/2″ by 10″ once

Car seat belt 2 metres

Bias binding 1 metre

Fabric glue

Fabric paint

Paint brush

Strap
Strap fixtures

To make:-

Paint the car design onto the lining fabric. You could create a print with lino. Or use a cookie cutter to print a line image of the car. Paint the edge of the cookie cutter and simply print onto the fabric. Use the cookie cutter to cut out a car design on a potato then potato print a solid car design on the pocket.

Iron fusible fleece to the back of the main fabric, leaving one piece of the main fabric with no fusible fleece on it (this is the flap of the bag).

Iron the interfacing to the back of the lining fabric.

Body of the bag

Pin the side panels to the front of the bag, right sides together. Stitch from the top of the bag down to the bottom of the fusible fleece. Stopping the seam here helps form the base of the bag easily.

pin-sides-of-bag

Place the base of the bag along the bottom of the front panel and stitch along the edge of the fusible fleece. Stitch the base of the bag and side panels together along the fusible fleece line.

pin-base-of-bag

Pin and stitch the back of the bag panel to the sides and bag base.

Lining

Create the slip pocket. Fold over twice the top of the pocket and stitch. Press the sides and base of the pocket in half an inch. Pin centrally on one of the front/back panels of lining.

 

Double stitch round the sides and bottom of the pocket.

 

Flap of the bag

Cut seat belt fabric into five strips 12″ long. Using fabric adhesive carefully place down the flap panel, making sure they butt up as closely as possible.

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Weight down with a heavy book until the glue is dry.

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Once the glue is dry top stitch down the edge of each strap to ensure they are fully secured.

stitch-seat-belt-fabric

Place the lining of the flap right sides down, place the front of the flap on top right side facing you.

Curve the corners if you wish. Mark with tailors chalk a curve (I used a cup as a template) and trim the layers.

flap

Pin your bias binding round the sides and bottom of the flap. Stitch in place.

bias

Fold the bias binding over to the back, pin from the front ensuring you capture the back neatly, then top stitch in place.

bias-binding

Bag assembly

Strap handles – cut two pieces of strap 71/2″ long. Thread on metal loop. Place the strap in a loop on the side panel. Stitch in place securely, ensuring the join of the loop is beneath the stitches.

loop

Place the flap onto the back of the bag. Work out the central point just in from the bottom of the flap and insert magnetic snap  into the lining. Work out corresponding point on the front of the bag and insert the other half of the magnetic snap.

Pin then baste the flap along the back edge of the bag (right sides together).

Place the main bag inside the lining so the right sides are together. Pin in place.

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Stitch around leaving a turning gap along the front of the bag.

Turn right side out. Turn in the raw edges along the turning gap and pin in place. Top stitch right round this seam (this secures the turning gap and provides a little extra strength to the bag)

 

Lastly add strap 60″ long using a slider for adjustable cross body strap.


I’m loving this fun car themed bag.

 This post is sponsored by Volkswagen – check out other recycled and or car related tutorials by fellow bloggers on the Volkswagen collaborative Pinterest board “DIY Bloggers for Volkswagen“.

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DIY drawstring car play mat (post sponsored by Volkswagen)

DIY drawstring car play mat (post sponsored by Volkswagen)
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Do you have children, nephews, friends who love playing with cars? Why not create a DIY drawstring car play mat, perfect for storage of cars, plus play. I love how with the addition of a drawstring means the play mat pulls up into draw string bag. So easy to tidy away when the child has finished playing.

This play mat includes a zoo, park, street of houses, hospital and garage, but only your imagination is the limit! If you are making it for someone in particular you can add what appeals to them. You may remember that my son loves animals, I had to include a zoo!! If you include a zoo here is a free downloadable template for the lion, giraffe and elephant.

This is my sketched design. I found this very helpful when placing the fabric shapes to create the various areas.

My top tip is to allow time, this playmat took two solid days to make.

To make a drawstring play mat you will need:
Two circles of fabric measuring , one for the external bag and one for the play mat side
Tailors chalk
Strong, heat reactive, sheet of glue which permanently bonds one fabric to another when ironed
Fabric glue
Black fabric
White fabric paint
Scraps of fabric
sewing machine

To make
Start by measuring a circle in your fabric. Fold your fabric into quarters. Measure out in a quarter circle with tailors chalk. I added string to mine, holding it tight at the central point then drawing out and round. Once you have one circle use it as your template for the other circle. My circles are 50″across (25″ string).

Cut out fabric to create your roads.

Due to the size I suggest using fabric glue to hold them in place, then stitching along the edges in zigzag to firmly hold them in place. Paint on your central markings on the roads with fabric paint.

Now you have a frame work to start building up the different areas.

Decide on fabric choices for each building, tree, shape. Iron your sheet of glue onto the reverse. Cut out the right size in the fabric and then iron into place on the playmat. Use parchment paper to protect your iron.

Once you have finished the shape, such as a house, stitch the applique in place.

Hand stitch the details onto the animals. I used french knots for the eyes.

To make a sign for your garage use freezer paper. Cut a piece larger than A4, iron the waxy side to the wrong side of your fabric. Trim your fabric to A4 size. Place in your printer and print the design. You can download it here.

Here are some close ups of various areas.

Let’s finish the play mat. Create two small button holes on the external fabric  3/4″ in from the edge.

Place the right sides of the fabric together. Stitch round the circle except a turning gap.

Clip into the seam allowance. Press. Turn right sides out and press, including turning in the edge of the turning gap.

Top stitch round the edge. Then stitch round again 1/2″ . This creates a tube for feeding the drawstring through.

Lastly feed the drawstring through and secure with a double knot.

This post is sponsored by Volkswagen – check out other recycled and/or car related tutorials by fellow bloggers on the Volkswagen collaborative pinterest board “DIY Bloggers for Volkswagen“.

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vickymyerscreations

vickymyerscreations

I am inspired by our wonderful world, creation is constant and yet changing. I feel it is important to respect the environment and where possible to upcycle/recycle. Blessed with creativity I try to appreciate it and develop it:) Thanks for taking the time to read my blog, please do sign up to follow my journey:)

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