Sewing Archives - vicky myers creations

What to make with fabric scraps?? Free fabric scraps clutch tutorial

What to make with fabric scraps?? Free fabric scraps clutch tutorial
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Do you have endless piles of fabric scraps?? I know I do … over the years I have had a variety of storage solutions ranging from cute denim baskets, clear plastic bags and even plastic shoe boxes.

I have to admit my stash of scraps can become overwhelming. Regular readers will know that I hate waste, I have a strong preference for recycling or upcycling. There are so many ideas for using fabric scraps its hard to throw them away!!  Today I am going to share you with you a fabric scrap clutch tutorial.

What’s not to love about a clutch, great for day or evening why not make one with your precious scraps of your favourite fabrics?

Fabric scrap clutch tutorial

Supplies

  • Scraps
  • Iron on interfacing
  • Fusible fleece
  • Base fabric 16 by 12″
  • Front of bag fabric 8 by 10″
  • Lining fabric 24″ by 10 1/2″
  • Ruler and pencil
  • scissors/rotary cutter
  • glue stick
  • sewing machine
  • button

To make:

Place fabric scraps onto your base fabric. Once you are pleased with the layout pin or using your glue stick hold in place.

Machine stitch the scraps – I have used an applique stitch on my sewing machine. Alternatively you could use a zig zag machine. Test your tension first on a fabric sample (I would hate you to ruin your scraps with an uneven tension).

Cut your scrap fabric piece to measure 14 by 10″. On the reverse mark 4 3/4″ up on the left hand side, 1 3/4″ up on the right hand side. Along the bottom mark 6 3/4″ in on the left hand side 2 1/2″ in on the right hand side.

Use these marks as your cutting line to create the triangle front design of the bag.

Iron interfacing to your front panel piece. Place this right sides together along the short straight edge of the scrap fabric. Stitch the seam with a 1/4″ seam allowance then press.

Iron the fusible fleece to the reverse of the lining fabric. Using your fabric scrap piece as a guide cut out the front flap triangular shape.

Place the lining and the main bag right sides together. Stitch the short side and the triangular shape. Trim the seam allowance around the point of the triangular shape being careful not to cut into the seam stitching.

Turn right side out and press.

Fold and press as your finished clutch. Sew your button hole in the v shape, ensuring the top of the button hole is parallel or shorter than the start of the straight edge (on the left hand side as you look at it)

Turn inside out so right sides are touching. Fold the bag in as per the picture.

Stitch the side seams allowing a turning gap on the closing flap.

Turn right side out, press in the side seam.

Top stitch round the v flap. Finally add your button.

No time for making a scrap fabrics clutch today?? Why not pin it for later?

Today I am taking part in a blog hop all about fabric scraps which is hosted by Jen of Faith and Fabric. Fabric scraps can be a great source of inspiration, they are free and worth far more to you than sending to landfill in your bin!! Please do check out all the creative ideas being shared today as part of this blog hop:

Faith and Fabric

Swoodson Says

Quilting is much more fun than housework

The Cloth Parcel

Hilltop Custom Designs

Lulu & Celeste

Made by Chrissie D

Fabric Engineer

 

 

 

 

 

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Sewing for a tween – Growing Up Handmade Blog Tour

Sewing for a tween – Growing Up Handmade Blog Tour
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I don’t know about you but finding appropriate clothes for a tween can be slightly tricky. My daughter is developing her sense of style, but is at that awkward stage of outgrowing the clothes ranges we usually shop at (she in age 12 clothes). As a mere 10 year old teenager ranges are not suitable for her in style. I find clothes buying and making rather stressful.

So the opportunity to take part in this Growing Up Handmade tour seemed a great idea, focussing me to sew for a tween. The challenge for her and I to find patterns and fabric she likes the look of. Children come in all shapes and sizes, sewing for her means I can adjust patterns to fit her shape – she often finds sleeves a little tight on the arms.

We both fell in love with the pattern by Love Notions called Li’l LDT. The options seem endless, a shirt, tunic and dress with five different sleeves and four different necklines. The size range is impressive too, ranging from age 2 to 16, great value for money. I bought mine from Etsy here.

I have made her two items. We started with knit fabric I had in my stash to create a dress with a fabulous hem line and cowl neck. My daughter LOVES this dress, she has worn all weekend every weekend!!!

sewing for a tween

May be because she lives in black leggings and this black jacket?! They pair so well together.

Secondly she loved the idea of a hoody (personally ??? what? where did that come from??!), I ordered this navy jersey from Minerva Crafts. It has a slight texture to it, adding a touch of detail.

I adjusted the pattern a little, sewing a 12 I shortened the sleeves and made the hood slightly smaller. With the remainder of the fabric I  managed to squeeze an age 3 dress out for my niece.

sewing for a tween

I have loved sewing for a tween – the team effort of fabric choice and pattern resulted in two items she practically lives in. Such a win win – plus of course it’s such a versatile pattern from which I can sew many more items for her. I hope this blog tour will inspire you to sew for a tween.
There is a fabulous giveaway running alongside this blog tour, with some great prizes from various sponsors:
a Rafflecopter giveaway

 Please do visit the other bloggers taking part to find lots of great inspiration.

Monday – April 17th
Handmade Boy | Paisley Roots | Cucicucicoo: Eco Sewing & Crafting

Tuesday – April 18th
Beri Bee Designs | Phat Quarters | Sewing By Ti | Sew and Tell Project

Wednesday – April 19th
The Wholesome Mama | Rebel & Malice | Vicky Myers Creations

Thursday – April 20th
Pattern Revolution | Skirt Fixation | SewSophieLynn | EYMM

Friday – April 21st
Round Up and Giveway Winners

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Permission to fail – refashioning

Permission to fail – refashioning
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I love the concept of restyling clothes, creating a new item out of thrifted old clothes. The process of refashioning can be fun, creative, challenging, this in itself is motivating. Plus of course the finished result is unique, fits you and your style. However it doesn’t always go to plan..! Give your self permission to fail, it is only through failing do we learn.

Fail at refashioning

Refashioning usually starts with an end vision, a concept of where you are going to take the item of clothing or the combination of several items. The finished refashion does not always match the vision.

Personally being a larger size limits the choice of fabric/items to refashion in charity shops. I struggle to visualize where I can take a preloved item of clothing. Plus I have limited experience at refashioning.

Recently I found this beautiful purple knit fabric plus a small navy dress, the colour’s pair beautifully together. 

A good starting point for refashioning is to use an existing garment in your wardrobe as a template for cutting the fabric/old clothing. Using an existing tunic I cut the old clothes to size.

So far my project is going to plan, navy top with purple base to the tunic, making the most of the widest part of both garments and the hem.

But then I failed, I used my overlocker (serger) to sew the two fabrics together. My lack of experience with knit fabrics came to light, somehow the tension is just wrong. The seam is ripply, not flat. The top just does not hang right! It maybe that this is to do with the settings on the overlocker, or the combination of the fabrics. The navy fabric has a ripple to it which may not cope with being attached to a flat fabric?

My reaction was of frustration with myself. Why did my project fail? How can I fix it? My time is limited and precious, naturally my desire is for every creative project to succeed.

” It is only through failure and through experiment that we learn and grow” Issac Stern

When a project fails it is disappointing and can be extremely frustrating. Turn it on its head, what have you learnt? what will you do differently next time?

Practice, practice, practice – this is the way l will learn how to master the tension on my overlocker. The fear of failure can hold us back but failure is an essential part of creativity, its how we learn and grow. As my daughters school teacher says “FAIL means First Attempt In Learning”

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vickymyerscreations

vickymyerscreations

I am inspired by our wonderful world, creation is constant and yet changing. I feel it is important to respect the environment and where possible to upcycle/recycle. Blessed with creativity I try to appreciate it and develop it:) Thanks for taking the time to read my blog, please do sign up to follow my journey:)

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